Remembering FDR

We have always known that heedless self-interest was bad morals; we know now that it is bad economics. Out of the collapse of a prosperity whose builders boasted their practicality has come the conviction that in the long run economic morality pays. We are beginning to wipe out the line that divides the practical from the ideal; and in so doing we are fashioning an instrument of unimagined power for the establishment of a morally better world.”
– Franklin D. Roosevelt, “Second Inaugural Address,” January 11, 1944

“We have come to a clear realization of the fact that true individual freedom cannot exist without economic security and independence. “Necessitous men are not free men.” People who are hungry and out of a job are the stuff of which dictatorships are made.

In our day these economic truths have become accepted as self-evident. We have accepted, so to speak, a second Bill of Rights under which a new basis of security and prosperity can be established for all—regardless of station, race, or creed.

Among these are:

● The right to a useful and remunerative job in the industries or shops or farms or mines of the nation;

● The right to earn enough to provide adequate food and clothing and recreation;

● The right of every farmer to raise and sell his products at a return which will give him and his family a decent living;

● The right of every businessman, large and small, to trade in an atmosphere of freedom from unfair competition and domination by monopolies at home or abroad;

● The right of every family to a decent home;

● The right to adequate medical care and the opportunity to achieve and enjoy good health;

● The right to adequate protection from the economic fears of old age, sickness, accident, and unemployment;

● The right to a good education.

All of these rights spell security. And after this war is won we must be prepared to move forward, in the implementation of these rights, to new goals of human happiness and well-being.

America’s own rightful place in the world depends in large part upon how fully these and similar rights have been carried into practice for all our citizens. For unless there is security here at home there cannot be lasting peace in the world.”
– Franklin D. Roosevelt, “Second Bill of Rights,” January 11, 1944

Why Health Care Matters and the Current Debt Does Not

After taking note of a slide in this 2012 Randy Wray video, I chased down the source for this much quoted statement from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, from Why Health Care Matters and the Current Debt Does Not Oct, 2011

As the sole manufacturer of dollars, whose debt is denominated in dollars, the U.S. government can never become insolvent, i.e., unable to pay its bill. In this sense, the government is not dependent on credit markets to remain operational. Moreover, there will always be a market for U.S. government debt at home because the U.S. government has the only means of creating risk-free dollar denominated assets.

After a lifetime of feeling vaguely gaslighted, it’s a relief when economists help me understand how things work. In looking for the source, I came across a group of interesting quotes in this post from economist John Harvey (@John_T_Harvey):

“The United States can pay any debt it has because we can always print money to do that. So there is zero probability of default.”
— Alan Greenspan

“In the case of United States, default is absolutely impossible. All U.S. government debt is denominated in U.S. dollar assets.”
— Peter Zeihan, Vice President of Analysis for STRATFOR

“In the case of governments boasting monetary sovereignty and debt denominated in its own currency, like the United States (but also Japan and the UK), it is technically impossible to fall into debt default.”
— Erwan Mahe, European asset allocation and options strategies adviser

“There is never a risk of default for a sovereign nation that issues its own free-floating currency and where its debts are denominated in that currency.”
— Mike Norman, Chief Economist for John Thomas Financial

“There is no inherent limit on federal expenses and therefore on federal spending…When the U.S. government decides to spend fiat money, it adds to its banking reserve system and when it taxes or borrows (issues Treasury securities) it drains reserves from its banking system. These reserve operations are done solely to maintain the target Federal Funds rate.”
— Monty Agarwal , managing partner and chief investment officer of MA Managed Futures Fund

Our growing collection of quotes are here.

Gleaned from Twitter and Facebook

“The core MMT (Modern Monetary Theory – ed) academics have all been tenured (many of us more than once) based on strength of peer-reviewed publications, including heavy empirical/theoretical work. Please rise above this dismissive rhetoric.”
Stephanie Kelton

“First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win”
— unknown, though often attributed to Ghandi

“The US government doesn’t use income. It generates government “money” when it spends, which becomes income for the private sector.

The federal budget goes through a lengthy process: In general, the President submits a budget to Congress which goes to the budget committees of the House and Senate, then on to budget resolutions. Congress can propose its own budget prior to the President’s. Whether or not spending must be constructed as a bill (legislation) depends on if spending is discretionary, or mandatory.

If spending is discretionary, this requires annual legislation passed by Congress and submitted to the President for signature or veto. If mandatory, spending simply occurs.”
Ellis Winningham

“Government Can’t Run Out Of Money”

The crazy idea that We the People can have nice things is reaching a wider audience.

Over at HuffPo, in Stephanie Kelton Has The Biggest Idea In Washington, Zach Carter writes about how “MMT” is catching on,

“Modern monetary theorists believe that confusion around money has distracted economists from the real things that affect the economic health of society ― natural resources, technology, available labor. Money is a tool governments use to manage these variables and solve social problems. It is not a scarce resource that governments have to track down in order to pay for projects.”

Please go read. It’s worth it.

“The basic idea is that the government can’t run out of money,” Kelton said. “It creates money just by spending.”

There Are No Real Republican “Deficit Hawks.” Here’s Why. Part 2

This posts changes a few words from a previous post.

Democrats are making a terrible mistake fighting the Republican tax cuts spending increases by saying they add to the deficit, that they will “blow a hole in the budget,” etc.

Why are Democrats saying this? They are using the “increase deficits” line because they think they can appeal to a few “deficit hawk” Republicans who spent the Obama years complaining about government sending and “deficits.”

It is a mistake for Democrats to think they can “get Republican votes” by mouthing Republican deficit-fear rhetoric without understanding the strategy behind their rhetoric.

Strategy: Republicans Create Deficits, Stoke Deficit Fear, Then Campaign Against Government Spending

Here’s the thing. There are no real Republican “deficit hawks.” Republicans stoke deficit fear, and then say they are opposed to budget deficits. But they always, always increase deficits. On purpose. There’s a reason.

Continue reading “There Are No Real Republican “Deficit Hawks.” Here’s Why. Part 2″

The Word Is Spreading – DownWithTyranny

At DownWithTyranny, Happy New Year– So How Do We Pay For All The Stuff Bernie Is Campaigning On?

You’ll need to understand this stuff when you argue with your brother-in-law next Thanksgiving. By then, even he may be admitting he likes, for example, Medicare For All, but is worried how we’ll pay for it. Unless he’s already a student of Stephanie Kelton’s economic work, he probably has no idea.

The DownWithTyranny post links to TruthOut’s somewhat hard-to-read “But How Will We Pay for It?”: Modern Monetary Theory and Democratic Socialism, by Sean Keith and Alexander Kolokotronis.

There Are No Real Republican “Deficit Hawks.” Here’s Why.

Democrats are making a terrible mistake fighting the Republican tax cuts by saying they add to the deficit, that they will “blow a hole in the budget,” etc.

Why are Democrats saying this? They are using the “increase deficits” line because they think they can appeal to a few “deficit hawk” Republicans who spent the Obama years complaining about government sending and “deficits.”

It is a mistake for Democrats to think they can “get Republican votes” by mouthing Republican deficit-fear rhetoric without understanding the strategy behind their rhetoric.

Strategy: Republicans Create Deficits, Stoke Deficit Fear, Then Campaign Against Government Spending

Here’s the thing. There are no real Republican “deficit hawks.” Republicans stoke deficit fear, and then say they are opposed to budget deficits. But they always, always increase deficits. On purpose. There’s a reason.

Continue reading “There Are No Real Republican “Deficit Hawks.” Here’s Why.”

Should Government Balance The Budget?

We hear a lot that government budgets need to be balanced “like a household budget” that is decided “around a kitchen table.”

To balance the budget government has to either tax us more or spend less on things that make our lives better. That takes money out of circulation and does us no favors.

With less money in circulation businesses and households have to turn to the banks to borrow. And they have to pay interest to those banks.

Balancing the budget causes the private sector to turn to the banks and go into debt? The “financial sector” makes big bucks from that while the rest of us have less? Hey, wait a minute… who is pushing this “balance the budget” nonsense?

Trump’s Budget Director Explains MMT (Sort Of)

Atrios had a nice catch this morning. Trump’s Budget Director Mick Mulvaney explained that our government needs to run budget deficits to grow the economy.

Atrios linked to a Bloomberg Politics piece, The GOP Tax Plan Is Already Hitting Speed Bumps, that quotes Mulvaney,

White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney is signaling similar flexibility, saying on CNN Sunday that decisions about deductions remain up in the air as “the bill is not finished yet.” He took it a step further on Fox News Sunday, by adding that a tax plan that doesn’t add to the deficit won’t spur growth.

“I’ve been very candid about this. We need to have new deficits because of that. We need to have the growth,” Mulvaney said.

Budgets that don’t add to the deficit won’t spur growth.

So there’s that.